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April 8, 2016

5 Interesting Fusion Cuisines in India That You Must Try

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India is a melting pot of cultures and lives, and there is no reason why food should be left behind. Here is a list of interesting fusion cuisines in India: #1 Tamil-French Fusion Creole Cuisine Native to Pondicherry, Creole food is more Indian than French in this aspect, but otherwise entirely
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India is a melting pot of cultures and lives, and there is no reason why food should be left behind. Here is a list of interesting fusion cuisines in India:

#1 Tamil-French Fusion Creole Cuisine

Native to Pondicherry, Creole food is more Indian than French in this aspect, but otherwise entirely unique in its flavours. With inexpensive origins and a tilt towards Indian spices and local ingredients — such as coconut, kombu turmeric, eggs, freshly caught fish and vegetables like brinjals and broad beans — it was originally very spicy.

#2 Chinese-Indian Tangra Cuisine

Indian spices and Chinese dishes make for a very interesting cuisine that is both tangy and hot at the same time, found in Chinatown in Kolkata. Their primary focus on soya sauce, vinegar and cornflour in gravies gives the food a very distinct taste and appearance and texture.

#3 Irani Parsi Cuisine

Brought to India by the Iranian-Persian immigrants, the food is simple and has Parsi influences along with meaty Iranian flavours.

#4 Nepali- Sikkimese- Tibetan Cuisine

Sikkim is a place where people from Nepal and Tibet also have an amalgamated past, and thus the food habits of these people have also fused together. There is heavy consumption of meat and maida, along with fresh vegetables, cheese, butter and red hot chillies.

#5 Konkani- Portugese Cuisine in Goa 

The Portuguese influence on Goan cuisine that amalgamates with Konkani cuisine makes for in an interesting delicacy. The main ingredient is pork with its many varieties, and red chillies and jaggery for making desserts directly imported from Portugal.

 

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